geoscienceworld:

Hawaiian lava flow from Kilauea Volcano (von Konabish)

ecocides:

Folding Lava - Kilauea, Hawaii | image by Justin Reznick

thescienceofrealities:

A geologist cautiously approaches a fountain of molten rock.Mauna Ulu, Kilauea Crater, Mauna Loa VolcanoHawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands.1974 NGImage Credit : Robert Madden
Source: Milky way scientists

COOL GUYS NEVER LOOK AT ERUPTIONS

thescienceofrealities:

A geologist cautiously approaches a fountain of molten rock.

Mauna Ulu, Kilauea Crater, Mauna Loa Volcano

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands.

1974 NG

Image Credit : Robert Madden

Source: Milky way scientists

COOL GUYS NEVER LOOK AT ERUPTIONS

geologyboy:

Hawaiin Basalts.
… on a bit of an igneous rush, which is odd, as it’s not my favourite.

Gorgeous.

geologyboy:

Hawaiin Basalts.

… on a bit of an igneous rush, which is odd, as it’s not my favourite.

Gorgeous.

sunrec:

Erik is an assistant professor of geosciences at Denison University. He’s worked on volcanoes in Chile, New Zealand and the western United States and writes about worldwide volcanic activity, volcano research and science.

This post is based on a question I was posed in my “Introduction to Rocks and Minerals” class. Now, mind you, it isn’t a serious question, but when I thought about how to answer it, I realized how completely wrong everybody has been about it. The revelation was so clear I half expected the planet to be destroyed to make way for a bypass. So, before that happens, I thought a blog post might be a great way to explain why.

So, what was the question? This (slightly paraphrased):“In that scene from Return of the King when Gollum falls into the pit of lava, would he have really just sunk into the lava like that?”