QuestionHi. I read the explanation you gave about the life of Chiune Sugihara. Concerning the part about his descendents receiving permanent Israeli citizenship, do you know how that worked? My understanding is that Japan does not permit any form of dual citizenship. Answer

No idea. My guess is that either it is more “the option is always open” thing or that the citizenship was granted before the 1985 “Only One Nationality” Law was enacted (so anyone with dual citizenship before then was grandfathered in).

fairymascot:

lgbtqblogs:

Check out this cute school poster from Japan that teaches kids about lesbian, gay, bisexual and asexual people. The “Who Will You Come To Like?” poster is part of a health series of educational materials.

According to ROYGBIV, the two blurbs at the top right say:

When young people reach puberty they often like other people this is called sexual attraction. Depending on who a person likes, this is their sexual orientation. Most are heterosexual, but people who are homosexual and bisexual are not altogether a small group. Sexual orientation is innate and it cannot be changed by intervention, so there is no need to change your preferences.

and

However, adolescence is a time when one generally discovers their sexual orientation. When it comes to understanding one’s sexual orientation, one should take as much time as is needed.

This version of the poster was put outside of the nurse’s office at Saitama Prefecture’s Sayama Keizai School of Economics.

THIS!! IS!! SO!! CUTE!!

I just want to point out that the title can also be translated as “I wonder who I’ll come to like?”, which makes it even CUTER, like exploring your sexuality is a fun adventure to look forward to!! this is the most adorable thing in the world

kickass-hetalia:

beautifulsnk:

flomation:

PLEASE READ THIS POST
See this statue? It’s located at the Glendale Central Library. Big deal right? Yes. Yes it is. 
She stands here today as a memorial for the victims of the sexual slavery and abuse committed by the Japanese imperial military during WWII. Right now, Japan is running a petition to take her down.
We cannot let this happen.
Every Wednesday, the woman of Korea that were used as sexual slaves protest and cry out. However, Japan refuses to acknowledge their suffering. There have been no apologies and no recognition.
Please, please don’t let them get rid of her. Their pain deserves to be recognized and sympathized.
Luckily, There is a petition going on to save the girl and allow her to continue standing in Glendale CL. The link can be found here and you can read more about everything that she stands for here.  
Thank you so much for reading this. Even if you can’t sign this, please signal boost so other people will. 
[[A big thank you to tumblr user did-we-just-marry-thedevil for bringing this to my attention]]

If this statue is taken down, we are erasing the memories and pain of the thousands of Korean (and Chinese) sex slaves during WWII. As a Korean female myself, this is even more disheartening.
Please signal boost.

REBLOG

kickass-hetalia:

beautifulsnk:

flomation:

PLEASE READ THIS POST

See this statue? It’s located at the Glendale Central Library. 
Big deal right? Yes. Yes it is. 

She stands here today as a memorial for the victims of the sexual slavery and abuse committed by the Japanese imperial military during WWII. Right now, Japan is running a petition to take her down.

We cannot let this happen.

Every Wednesday, the woman of Korea that were used as sexual slaves protest and cry out. However, Japan refuses to acknowledge their suffering. There have been no apologies and no recognition.

Please, please don’t let them get rid of her. Their pain deserves to be recognized and sympathized.

Luckily, There is a petition going on to save the girl and allow her to continue standing in Glendale CL. The link can be found here and you can read more about everything that she stands for here.  

Thank you so much for reading this. Even if you can’t sign this, please signal boost so other people will. 

[[A big thank you to tumblr user did-we-just-marry-thedevil for bringing this to my attention]]

If this statue is taken down, we are erasing the memories and pain of the thousands of Korean (and Chinese) sex slaves during WWII. As a Korean female myself, this is even more disheartening.

Please signal boost.

REBLOG

dashielsheen:

koreaunderground:

Japan Officially Clears Use of Controversial ‘Rising Sun’ Flag

The Japanese government plans to legitimatize its stance on the use of a flag that symbolizes Japanese imperialism during World War II, according to a report.

Japanese newspaper Sankei Shimbun, a conservative daily, reported Tuesday that the government decided to establish a stronger stance on using the rising sun flag. The report comes after the Korea Football Association, South Korean soccer’s governing body, filed a complaint against Japanese soccer fans who waved the flag during a match against Korea in Seoul last month.

Such a move will certainly add more fuel to the contentious relationship between the Japanese and South Korean governments. The two countries have been at odds with each other on several political issues, which include a territorial dispute and controversy surrounding the conscription of wartime sexual slaves by the Japanese military during World War II.

The rising sun flag was initially prohibited by the Japanese government after the World War II, but a modified version of the flag was used by Japan’s Self-Defense Forces in 1954. Today, the Japanese navy uses the same flag.

Although Korea and China, two countries that suffered under Japanese rule during the first few decades of the 20th century, view the flag as an equivalent of Nazi Germany’s swastika, the symbol on the flag started to appear more frequently in recent years, especially during sporting events.

via http://iamkoream.com/japan-officially-clears-use-of-controversial-rising-sun-flag/

alt: http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2013/08/08/2013080801455.html

Not so coincidentally, anti-Korean supremacist group, Zaitokukai (complete with an official website), have also been making use of the Rising Sun flag to emphasize their recent calls to massacre* Koreans (often followed by epithets like “cockroaches” and “whores”), among other neocolonial, racist shit. Tokyo’s Shin Okubo and Osaka’s Tsuruhashi have been frequent targets of such Zaitokukai demonstrations and harassment because of the area’s well-known Korean – officially labeled as Zainichi – population. Apparently, their anti-Korean hate is too extreme even for “mainstream” neo-nationalists, but little is being done by the Japanese government to firmly and outspokenly act (not just chide) against their activities or afford long-term, constitutional protection for the rights of Korean-Japanese.

And here’s the thing: Zaitokukai didn’t come out of nowhere and their rise in extremism should not be lightly dismissed as a surprise, either. Zaitokukai members emerged from a society whose imperial, war criminal past was whitewashed in a positive light along with victim blaming, enforced by the government with their approval of such textbooks and the media for failing to address or cover anti-Korean racism from a Zainichi perspective.

*Perhaps the most famous example is the clip in which a middle school girl, the daughter of a Zaitokukai leader, calls for the massacre of Koreans à la Nanjing Massacre in Tsuruhashi (though she could’ve just as easily referenced the massacre of Koreans following the 1923 Kanto Earthquake), but there are other examples with greater organization and numbers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Japanese commuters push 32-ton train to free woman

TOKYODozens of Japanese train passengers pushed a 32-ton train carriage away from the platform to free a woman who had fallen into the eight-inch gap between the train and platform during the busy morning rush hour Monday.

The act of heroism was captured by a newspaper photographer, whose photo of the rescue ran in the Yomiuri daily’s evening edition.

A public announcement that a passenger was trapped prompted about 40 people to join train officials to push the carriage, whose suspension system allows it to lean to either side, according to the Yomiuri newspaper, Japan’s largest daily.

The unnamed woman in her 30s was then pulled out uninjured to applause from onlookers at JR Minami-Urawa station, just north of Tokyo.

After just an eight-minute delay, the train went on its way.


 AP PHOTO/NORIHIRO SHIGETA, YOMIURI SHIMBUN

Kim Bok-dong (left) and Kil Won-ok attend a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul on May 29. (Yonhap News)

Koreans donate to women victimized by sex crimes during Vietnam War

Two Korean former sex slaves during the Japanese colonial era are raising funds to support other victims of wartime sexual violence around the world.

The so-called Butterfly Fund was formed by 87-year-old Kim Bok-dong and 84-year-old Kil Won-ok to support female victims of the Vietnam War and civil wars in Africa, the Korean Council for Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan said Monday. 



The fund sent $6,000 and $4,000 to 43-year-old Euguyen Ban Luang and 43-year-old Euguyen Ti Kim, respectively, last month. The sisters were victims of sexual violence committed during the Vietnam War. Their mother conceived them when she was raped by a Korean soldier.

When the Vietnam War broke out in 1965, former president Park Chung-hee sent more than 300,000 soldiers to support the U.S. military there. In regards to the suffering the deployment caused, former presidents Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun made official apologies to Vietnam.

“The Vietnamese suffered the same pain as us. This is the first step to compensate them,” the group said.

Most Vietnamese women who were sexually violated by Korean soldiers during the war were unable to maintain a normal marriage, according to a field study conducted by the council. Their children also had lower levels of income and education.

“I experienced that pain. I know all too well how much suffering that causes,” said Kil Won-ok, who was forcibly taken by the Japanese invading army at the age of 13.

“I want to comfort women who went through the same ordeal as I did,” Kil said, explaining why she established Butterfly Fund.

Prior to receiving the fund, Luang worked as a day laborer catching shrimps. Now Luang can lease a plot of land for 30 years to farm. Kim, who lives in Hanoi, will rent a building to run a store.

Originally, the Butterfly Fund was to use financial compensation from Japan, but the Japanese government refused to provide any compensation for the wartime atrocities it committed against women during World War II. Singer Lee Hyori donated 5 million won ($4,420) as the fund’s first campaigner, and 300 organizations joined in the effort to amass over 70 million won.

“Our ladies dream of a peaceful world,” said a spokesperson of the council. “We will see to it that the funds are given to those who need them the most.”

By Lee Sang-ju

(Source: paradelle)

michaelmidnight:

Japanese School Girls and Fake Dragon Ball Z Attacks!
The new DBZ film opens soon and it appears girls over in Japan are recreating some of the show’s signature moves!
I totally dig this!
Here’s the original article with more pictures from Kotaku!
michaelmidnight:

Japanese School Girls and Fake Dragon Ball Z Attacks!
The new DBZ film opens soon and it appears girls over in Japan are recreating some of the show’s signature moves!
I totally dig this!
Here’s the original article with more pictures from Kotaku!
michaelmidnight:

Japanese School Girls and Fake Dragon Ball Z Attacks!
The new DBZ film opens soon and it appears girls over in Japan are recreating some of the show’s signature moves!
I totally dig this!
Here’s the original article with more pictures from Kotaku!

michaelmidnight:

Japanese School Girls and Fake Dragon Ball Z Attacks!

The new DBZ film opens soon and it appears girls over in Japan are recreating some of the show’s signature moves!

I totally dig this!

Here’s the original article with more pictures from Kotaku!

(Source: michaelmidnight)

barefootmouse:

womenwhokickass:

Aya Kamikawa: Why she kicks ass
She is the only openly transgender official in Japan at this point, and the first to seek or win elected office in Japan.
She won a four-year term as an independent under huge media attention, placing sixth of 72 candidates running for 52 seats in the Setagaya ward assembly, the most populous district in Tokyo.  In April 2007, she was re-elected to her second term, placing second of 71 candidates running for 52 in the same ward assembly. 
While the government announced that they would continue to consider her male officially, she stated that she would work as a woman. 
She is devoted to work for various groups, the disabled, single-parent families, homeless people to evening junior high school students, LGBT people and to improve rights for women, children, the elderly.  She strives to give support for these people and bring positive changes which would help them in society. 
She was also a committee member for Trans-net Japan (a self-support group for transgender people) and organised meetings and social events to give support and symposiums to raise the public awareness.

I need to see more stories like this one every day. Actually we all do.

barefootmouse:

womenwhokickass:

Aya Kamikawa: Why she kicks ass

  • She is the only openly transgender official in Japan at this point, and the first to seek or win elected office in Japan.
  • She won a four-year term as an independent under huge media attention, placing sixth of 72 candidates running for 52 seats in the Setagaya ward assembly, the most populous district in Tokyo.  In April 2007, she was re-elected to her second term, placing second of 71 candidates running for 52 in the same ward assembly. 
  • While the government announced that they would continue to consider her male officially, she stated that she would work as a woman. 
  • She is devoted to work for various groups, the disabled, single-parent families, homeless people to evening junior high school students, LGBT people and to improve rights for women, children, the elderly.  She strives to give support for these people and bring positive changes which would help them in society. 
  • She was also a committee member for Trans-net Japan (a self-support group for transgender people) and organised meetings and social events to give support and symposiums to raise the public awareness.

I need to see more stories like this one every day. Actually we all do.

hanguknamja:

lostintrafficlights:

hanguknamja:

Korea's last prince, 이우. Died in 1945 in Hiroshima, Japan. (x)

The atomic bombing of Hiroshima not only took the life of one of the last Korean royals, it incinerated over 20,000 common Koreans, many of them forced laborers, at the hands of their enemy’s enemy, who not only did not distinguish between civilians and soldiers but refused to distinguish between the Japanese and their victims.

After the war, the few Korean survivors went unrecognised as victims of this atrocity, because they were not Japanese nationals, and neither they nor their offspring, many of whom suffered severe congenital malformations from the radiation poisoning, received compensation or adequate medical treatment.

They were thus triply victimized. First by the Japanese, who enslaved them. Second, by the Americans who exploded an atomic bomb over them indiscriminately. Third, by the world, for refusing to recognize them as victims of an atrocious crime against humanity. Even today, I’m surprised about how few people realise that so many Koreans were killed at Hiroshima (and Nagasaki).

Reblogged again for the commentary. 

1 in 7 of the victims in the Hiroshima bombing were Korean.

(Source: partimecat)

candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)
candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.
Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)

candidcantrix:

So, I was out in Odaiba with my parents during New Year, and we came across this big group of dogs dressed up in kimono for the occasion.

Unfortunately we just missed the part where they were all lined up for photos, but I knew there was at least one person on my dash who’d appreciate pictures of Japanese dogs in formalwear, so I took lots of photos anyway :)