gingerhaze:

ryannorth:

There’s a Boom Studios Humble Bundle going on right now and it’s NUTS.  Pay what you want for TONS of rad comics, but if you pay $15 or more, you not only get the COMPLETE Midas Flesh series, but also Lumberjanes, Bee and Puppycat, AND Bravest Warriors!  ALL OF THESE COMICS ARE GREAT.

My name is Ryan North and I have an opinion on what you should spend $15 on today.

WOW WHAT A DEAL

prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 
prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 
prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 

prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.

Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.

(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 

fuckyeahcaroldanvers:

Ms. Marvel #1, by G Willow Wilson

coming soon in 2014!

Kamala Khan will be depicted as a Jersey City resident with family from Pakistan, and a major fan of Carol Danvers, the former Ms. Marvel and current Captain Marvel. The origins of the character, the article states, began in conversations between Marvel editors Sana Amanat and Steve Wacker about Amanat’s experiences growing up as a Muslim-American.

More on CBR and Bleeding Cool!

charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)
Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)
I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D

charlattes:

charcom:

(Chapter 1 I suppose)

Fated Meeting

I thought of frens hardships and drew this up/edited real quick (2-3 hour idk)

I’m not sure if I’ll finish but I have more thoughts on it…

I really like this :D

(Source: )

anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH

anagrammaton:

sweet-arts:

Here’s Cindomrella, a stupid, ridiculous porn comic I drew a while back. Enjoy!

uHM BUT THIS IS ADORABLE???

OH MY GOSH

bridgemcgidge:

daydreamingandnightwondering:

No. You don’t understand how much I love Dick Grayson. Just look at him. Take a second and see what’s going on in the picture.

First of all, he is helping someone who’s been hurt. Why? Simple: because Dick is a loving and compassionate person who always jumps to the aid of those in need. He stands up for others because it is what is right and it is what he does. He’s not a superhero because of revenge or because of the thrill, he does so because he wants to help people, because he believes in justice. So he stands up to his superiors and even as Dick Grayson, he does not sit quietly allowing others —villians or assholes— hurt innocent people.

And what does he do when this ignorant asshole tries to insult him with his homophobic comment? He doesn’t even deny it. Because to him, it is not an insult. Because Dick is open and loving and has no prejudices. If his partner is gay, so be it. He doesn’t care. He will stand by him, and protect him, and defend him. He will look this asshole in the eye and let him know he’s not standing down no matter what. Because to him it makes not difference. He’s a person, he’s in need and he’s being hurt by someone. Dick is going to protect him no matter what. 

No. You don’t understand how much I love Dick Grayson.

Boom.

Dick Grayson everyone.

image

(Source: sweatlovebeer)

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

floresfabrications:

This is Jakey (Damian cosplayer) with his new friend Ethan at the San Jose Comicfest. Ethan is an extraordinarily artistic 8 year old with his own booth at the convention, whom Jakey consistently returned to during the day. When asked by Mick Gray (the inker for Batman and Robin), what his favorite part of the convention was, Jake told him it was meeting Ethan. At the end of the con, Ethan gifted the spider-man he had been working on all morning to Jakey and even signed his work. Ethan’s face when he handed the art to Jakey… omg. My heart cannot take how adorable they are. Jacob is now practicing how to draw a robin, so he can have something to give Ethan tomorrow. <3

OH MY GOD MY HEART
areyoutryingtodeduceme:

floresfabrications:

This is Jakey (Damian cosplayer) with his new friend Ethan at the San Jose Comicfest. Ethan is an extraordinarily artistic 8 year old with his own booth at the convention, whom Jakey consistently returned to during the day. When asked by Mick Gray (the inker for Batman and Robin), what his favorite part of the convention was, Jake told him it was meeting Ethan. At the end of the con, Ethan gifted the spider-man he had been working on all morning to Jakey and even signed his work. Ethan’s face when he handed the art to Jakey… omg. My heart cannot take how adorable they are. Jacob is now practicing how to draw a robin, so he can have something to give Ethan tomorrow. <3

OH MY GOD MY HEART

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

floresfabrications:

This is Jakey (Damian cosplayer) with his new friend Ethan at the San Jose Comicfest. Ethan is an extraordinarily artistic 8 year old with his own booth at the convention, whom Jakey consistently returned to during the day. When asked by Mick Gray (the inker for Batman and Robin), what his favorite part of the convention was, Jake told him it was meeting Ethan. At the end of the con, Ethan gifted the spider-man he had been working on all morning to Jakey and even signed his work. Ethan’s face when he handed the art to Jakey… omg. My heart cannot take how adorable they are. Jacob is now practicing how to draw a robin, so he can have something to give Ethan tomorrow. <3

OH MY GOD MY HEART

angrygirlcomics:

lady-banner:

Sooooooooooo, Tumblr. This is happening on Thursday. And I’m going to be presenting on a panel at it!!! 

Since you’ve had to put up with my whining blogging about working on this for the past month or two, I thought I’d explain what I’ll actually be talking about, heh. My presentation is called “Deafening Outcry: Hawkeye, Transformative Works, and the Re-Creation of Disability,” and explores Hawkeye’s hearing loss in the comics in the 1980s, the restoration of his hearing after a few years, and some fans’ re-insertion of Hawkeye’s hearing loss in fanfiction following the May 2012 release of The Avengers.  I highlight the importance of fanfiction and transformative works as a medium through which fans can create space for disability within superhero narratives to counter its erasure within popular culture.

I’m really, really really excited that this is finally so soon. Not even that nervous! Well. A bit. I keep telling myself that there probably won’t be very many people there so I won’t have to public speak to a fuck-ton of people.

I’m excited too to see what other people’s presentations are—disability and fandom isn’t something that is talked about a whole lot (at least, in the corners of fandom I frequent) so it’ll be veeeery interesting to be at a place where that’s the entire focus of conversation!!

(Also a HUGE, huge thank-you to everyone back in January who rec’d and sent me stuff  to get started on this!! And to all of my friends who have let me talk their ears off about it, of course. Y’all are the best <3)

if you guys are in the Syracuse area you should totally go to this and support Suzanne, who is lovely and amazing, along with the other panelists! 

punkrockartpirate:

gambitgrl:

ealperin:

ayellowbirds:

OUTRAGE: NOM Board Member and science fiction writer Orson Scott Card was hired as a writer for DC Comics’ new digital Adventures of Superman.

Orson Scott Card has penned anti-gay rants warning that marriage equality would lead to the end of civilization. 

It’s not just words. He’s even on the board of the notorious anti-gay organization fighting marriage equality, the National Organization for Marriage (NOM)![1]

We need to let DC Comics know they can’t support Orson Scott Card or his anti-gay efforts. They know they’re accountable to their fans, so if enough of us speak out now, they’ll hear us loud and clear.  

Sign now to tell DC Comics - Drop Orson Scott Card now! 

Just because someone is a good author, it doesn’t mean they’re a good person. Please click the link and sign to let DC know we don’t want OSC!

^SIGNED!!!^

EW! Fuck that, I might drop a few more DC titles from my subscription as a result. NO ORSON SCOTT CARD JFC DC EDITORIAL WHAT ARE YOU DOING.

racialicious:

iamdavidbrothers:

I want you to keep this two-page story by Matt Wayne, John Paul Leon, Noelle Giddings, and Dave Sharpe in mind this month. I want you to think of this every time someone — anyone, myself included — invokes Dwayne McDuffie’s name.
I want you to think about what they have to gain when they say the man’s name.

I’m not even a comics fan, and this got me choked up a little.
racialicious:

iamdavidbrothers:

I want you to keep this two-page story by Matt Wayne, John Paul Leon, Noelle Giddings, and Dave Sharpe in mind this month. I want you to think of this every time someone — anyone, myself included — invokes Dwayne McDuffie’s name.
I want you to think about what they have to gain when they say the man’s name.

I’m not even a comics fan, and this got me choked up a little.

racialicious:

iamdavidbrothers:

I want you to keep this two-page story by Matt Wayne, John Paul Leon, Noelle Giddings, and Dave Sharpe in mind this month. I want you to think of this every time someone — anyone, myself included — invokes Dwayne McDuffie’s name.

I want you to think about what they have to gain when they say the man’s name.

I’m not even a comics fan, and this got me choked up a little.

(Source: iamdavidbrothers)